Gongguan Night Market

Taipei’s Gongguan Night Market was not a huge market, but it was the closest to my hotel and I’d missed the experience in Seoul because I’d only stayed in South Korea’s capital a couple of nights. Continue reading Gongguan Night Market

Xinbeitou and Thermal Valley

Thermal Valley conjured up images of bubbling pools with the smell of sulphur wafting along the valley. Once I left Xinbentou Station, I followed a well-maintained pathway by a stream searching for my imagined Thermal Valley. Continue reading Xinbeitou and Thermal Valley

Through Mt Maokong’s dense forest

Half way along the Camphor Tree Trail by Ejiaoge Mountain, near the outer limits of Taipei City, a sign pointed towards YingHe Cave. I veered on to that trail and down countless steps and over a rocky path, lured by a cave. Continue reading Through Mt Maokong’s dense forest

High above Taipei City

On the edge of Taipei City I sailed up Maokong Mountain on the Maokong Gondola. As soon as I got to the top I heard a passenger in the cabin before mine go straight to the ticket counter and ask for a ticket to head back down again. I shook my head. Were they only interested in the ride? There was an entire mountain to explore. Continue reading High above Taipei City

Tamsui’s historic road?

Zhongshang Road claimed to have a number of “old” sites. Apart from Fuyou Temple, I didn’t see much that resembled Tamsui’s old history. In fact, Tamsui, part of New Taipei City, shone with newness while many of Taipei’s buildings needed a pressure washer. Continue reading Tamsui’s historic road?

Taiwan’s oldest temple

I wasn’t going to visit another temple, but as I made my way along Tamsui’s Zhongshan Road, I passed the oldest temple in Taiwan. My feet took over my thoughts and I stepped towards the side entrance. Continue reading Taiwan’s oldest temple

Tamsui’s Fisherman’s Wharf

About three kilometres from Fort San Domingo was Fisherman’s Wharf situated at the mouth of Tamsui River at the very north of Taiwan. This was an ideal spot to idle along pathways lining the water’s edge and eat an abundance of seafood on offer. Continue reading Tamsui’s Fisherman’s Wharf

A history of invasion

Fort San Domingo was a story of one European power after another seizing this location near the mouth of the Tamsui River. First the Spanish arrived in the early 1600s to deter Japanese troops invading. They built a wooden fort that was burnt down in 1636 when the aboriginal population rebelled against them. Just as they completed a stone fort, the viceroy of the Philippines commanded them to withdraw from Tamsui. Continue reading A history of invasion

A reserve that should have been preserved

When I caught a train to Tamsui, my eyes followed a trail running parallel to the tracks that continued all the way to the last MRT station. On the journey I spotted so many pieces of garbage it seemed like someone had tipped a box of never-ending litter along the route. Continue reading A reserve that should have been preserved

My travel diary

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