Faces the wind park

Cates Park was located at the mouth of Indian Arm, a thirty kilometre fiord. Across Burrard Inlet from its stony beach was Burnaby Mountain to the south, and Belcarra Park to the east. With over five hundred fires burning in the province, on the day I visited, the outlook was hazy from smoke drifting in from the interior. Continue reading Faces the wind park

A hike by the bay

Beginning at Williamstown’s Point Gellibrand Coastal Heritage Park, a trail ran parallel to Port Phillip Bay. I passed Shelley Beach where a multitude of sea birds gathered on the rocks extending into the sea. Others squawked overhead. Continue reading A hike by the bay

Crazy for birds exhibition

I was ready to exit North Vancouver’s Maplewood Flats when the sound of an exquisite guitar player lured me into a building near the entrance to the bird sanctuary. The 25thanniversary photography exhibition was in progress when I stepped through the entrance of the Corrigan nature house. Continue reading Crazy for birds exhibition

Sho-ren-in

Sho-ren-in was known as one of the five Monzeki temples in Kyoto whose head priests were originally from the imperial family. It was one of the main lodgings in the mountain used by several well known priests. Continue reading Sho-ren-in

A rare tower

Situated in Point Gellibrand Coastal Park on the outskirts of Williamstown was the timeball tower where Europeans first settled in Victoria. In 1849 when the tower was originally constructed, it was a lighthouse made from bluestone, quarried and built by convict prisoners. Some ten years later, the lighthouse became a timeball tower which allowed ships to adjust their chronometers. Continue reading A rare tower

North Shore mudflats

I have a thing for mangroves and mud. Perhaps it’s because of the days I followed in my father’s footsteps as he traipsed through mud catching crabs, sinking into the depths of the smooth, squelching ooze. Continue reading North Shore mudflats

My travel diary

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