The tail end of the Coquitlam River at Colony Farm

I’ve walked this section of the river countless times. It’s flat with a view of the Coastal Mountains in the distance. The river’s wider and calmer with the Millennium Pedestrian Bridge spanning the river a kilometre before the stream enters the Fraser River.

Coquitlam River from Millennium Bridge in summer
Coquitlam River from Millennium Bridge in summer
Lover Coquitlam River in winter, Colony Farm
Coquitlam River from Millennium Bridge in winter

While the section has less forest, it boasts more flowering plants: wild rose, yarrow, golden rod, skunk cabbage, lupins, blackberries, buttercup, bulrushes and lily pads. I often see more birds in this section too because it’s open. On my last hike I spotted a kingfisher for the first time as well as Canada geese, ducks and a heron.

Red - osier dogwood, Colony Farm
Red – osier dogwood, Colony Farm

In season, fishers wade into the stream at the junction of the Coquitlam and Fraser Rivers armed with their fishing rods. I glimpsed a poor homeless person’s tent on one walk. They often hide along the river, I’ve heard.

Sitka mountain ash, Colony Farm
Sitka mountain ash, Colony Farm

The Kwikwetlem First Nation live along this section of the river too. You can see where the river got its name. When I pass their reserve, one of the dogs usually barks but I rarely see anyone other than those using the trail.

Red alder, Colony Farm
Red alder, Colony Farm

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