All posts by Mallee Stanley

I grew up in Australia, but like many Ausies, I wanted to explore the world. After two years travelling around my birth country, I bought a one-way ticket in India and since those early travel days, have never lost the bug. I'm the author of several unpublished manuscripts set in various places I've lived. Two are set in East Africa going through the editing process; another I've picked up again after a long absence, and like the fourth set in New Zealand and Australia, I'm currently sharing with my writing group. I now call Canada home. This blog is about my travel experiences. If you visit my ReadandWrite blog, you'll find book reviews on my top choices and what I've learned about writing.

By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Along the Wreck Beach Trail I spied poles rising over the sand in the distance. This was where most people hung out, sitting on logs staring into the Straight of Georgia. Continue reading By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Nanzenji Temple

This Kyoto temple was once the headquarters for a sect of Zen Buddhism, but in 1291 the detached palace was converted into a temple. As I passed by the main hall, I couldn’t help notice the number of gardeners busily keeping the grounds immaculate.
Continue reading Nanzenji Temple

Vancouver’s infamous Wreck Beach

I stepped off UBC grounds and down steps for some 200 metres until I reached a stony beach. This was not your regular beach. The sign warned — a clothing optional beach. I had known this before I ventured down its steps, but thought on a brisk cool day I wouldn’t find anyone parading around without their clothes. Continue reading Vancouver’s infamous Wreck Beach

Fellmonger Park

Once this was the location of wool washers who used Hilliard Creek to scour wool after it was shorn from sheep. Fenced in were the remains of the buildings where scouring took place, but I wasn’t here for a history lesson, but a hike. Continue reading Fellmonger Park

Beyond the museum

Outside Vancouver’s Anthropology Museum was the Haida house exhibit. This group of First Nation buildings were from those who inhabited the Queen Charlotte Islands. The buildings were constructed back in the early 1960s under the guidance of First Nation artist, Bill Reid. He even carved some of the house poles and free standing Haida poles. Continue reading Beyond the museum

A nest on high

Only after I finished the Wellington Point trail, did I notice a tower on the opposite side of the road. It stretched up for about one hundred metres, and bent over a jumble of twigs perched an osprey. Continue reading A nest on high