Category Archives: Canada’s Maritime Provinces

Sunnyside’s Beothuk past

 

Driving in Newfoundland had been easy as there wasn’t a lot of traffic to contend with. I could have made the journey from west to east in a day if I’d pushed it but what was the rush? I stopped in Gander so that the next morning, I had time to investigate the narrow strip of land that joined Avalon Peninsula to the rest of Newfoundland.

On one side was Arnold’s Cove; on the opposite side, Sunnyside. There was a Beothuk/European memorial site where supposedly the two groups had once met peacefully. Continue reading Sunnyside’s Beothuk past

Arches Provincial Park

My Newfoundland trip was almost over and as is often the habit when I know my holiday is near the end, I want to drag it out a little longer.

As I drove back down the coast, I stopped at every point I thought might be of interest, first Bird Cove that turned out I needn’t have bothered, then Arches Provincial Park, that was definitely worth a look. Continue reading Arches Provincial Park

Goose Cove’s labrador tea

 

South of St Anthony’s lay what looked like a typical coastal fishing village. There was a trail over rocky terrain where a couple gazed at the sea where whales danced. Continue reading Goose Cove’s labrador tea

The Vikings of L’Anxe aux Meadows

On the way to L’Anxe aux Meadows, I spotted a tiny piece of white floating in the sea. That was my iceberg, the only one I saw. Had I started on the west coast and toured east, instead of the reverse, I would have been three weeks earlier and probably seen more. I put the thought out of my head because I was headed to what the Vikings called Vinland where they settled a thousand years ago. Continue reading The Vikings of L’Anxe aux Meadows

Flowers Cove thrombolites

Further north from Newfoundland’s Port au Choix was Flowers Cove where on a clear day, it was possible to see the coastline of Labrador. On the day I arrived in the tiny town, this wasn’t possible but I wasn’t disappointed because I’d come to see the thrombolites.

According to the sign along the well-maintained trail, thrombolites, or living rocks, were like the earliest forms of life on earth from over three billion years ago. Not only were they ancient, but rare. In fact, they are only found in one other place in the world, Shark Bay in Western Australia.

Port au Choix Trail

Because of the rich pickings from marine life, Port au Choix was another ancient spot where peoples (such as the Dorset Inuit) had lived for thousands of years.

Even though I visited the interpretive centre, I’d come, not for its archeological history, but to find interesting rock formations that lined the Gulf of St Lawrence. Continue reading Port au Choix Trail

Western Brook Fjord, Gros Morne

The southern trails were in sharp contrast to Western Brook Pond fjord. I’d hiked for an hour through low, but lush vegetation to arrive at a jetty where the tour boat would head out. I was told they weren’t sure when the next sail would be because the weather looked ominous. The only family waiting and I shrugged our shoulders. We’d taken the hike, so might as well see how the day turned out. Continue reading Western Brook Fjord, Gros Morne

Gros Morne National Park

Back on the main highway from Fleur de Lys, I was on my way to Gros Morne where I spent the next couple of days.

When I arrived at the tablelands the following morning, a tour group idled ahead and I caught up to listen as the guide pointed out strange rocks and vegetation that grew in the desolate location. Continue reading Gros Morne National Park

Inuit past in Fleur de Lys

I’d tried contacting a few accommodation sites around Fleur de Lys without success. No one responded to emails so I was ready to give up on this out of the way town. But when I arrived at the turn off, it was still early in the day, so I decided to drive the seventy or so kilometres to see the Inuit site I’d heard about. Continue reading Inuit past in Fleur de Lys