Tag Archives: Australia

the australian open

In January last year, I wound my way through Melbourne crowds that crisscrossed from one stadium to another. We headed to court three where a series of doubles were played and later wandered across the complex to watch a singles game. Our passes allowed us into any stadium (as long as there were seats) but this wasn’t the day for the superstars — Federer and Nadal. Their games came later.

Continue reading the australian open

collingwood’s street art

I’d strolled along Smith Street before, past Vietnamese restaurants, European specialist food stores and alternative clothing shops, but this visit, I came from a different direction.

Featured image — a Keith Harding replica street art

Continue reading collingwood’s street art

Why was part of ballarat closed off?

We hoped to park near Ballarat’s art gallery, but the road was closed. Police stood patrolling. People in iridescent green vests waved potential drivers away, but what was going on was hard to guess. 

Continue reading Why was part of ballarat closed off?

A city founded on gold

North-west of Melbourne was Victoria’s Ballarat, home to over 100,000 residents. The first Europeans settled in the area in 1838, but thirteen years later after an Aborigine found a nugget of alluvial gold, Ballarat’s gold rush brought thousands of hopeful prospectors from around the world. Although the alluvial gold became scarce after several years, underground mining continued until 1918.

Continue reading A city founded on gold

The world at our fingertips

We headed to Footscray, a western Melbourne suburb and arrived along a street where there must have been a dozen Indian restaurants as well as an Indian supermarket and a couple of glittering clothing shops. But after a quick grocery shop, we headed to the heart of Footscray to experience the rest of what the suburb had to offer.

Continue reading The world at our fingertips

why were geelong’s old buildings preserved?

Unlike most cities where highrise dominates the landscape, Geelong’s old buildings were spared demolition. There was a reason for this and it wasn’t just a handful of people who argued against the loss of these tasteful buildings.

Continue reading why were geelong’s old buildings preserved?

geelong’s Federal woollen mills

I headed to the western edge of Port Phillip Bay to North Geelong combing antique stores when I spotted the tasteful Federal Woollen Mills’ main building. The brick factory was constructed by the first Australian Labour Government in 1915 and offered better working conditions for factory employees. Workers were responsible for scouring, carding, dyeing, spinning and weaving Australian wool into cloth using the mill’s own power plant.

Continue reading geelong’s Federal woollen mills

by the bay

On an early morning hike I past two women heading to the beach with their surfboards. Wind swept over Port Phillip Bay, but still the waves were no higher than thirty centimetres. Further ahead was Station Pier Cruise Ship Terminal where the Queen Elizabeth was docked. Cars crawled past to enter the ferry that would later sail to Devonport, a journey I’d taken in my late teens.

Continue reading by the bay

Dinner by a Victoria point creek

A line of restaurants lined one side of Eprapah Creek where I ate lunch. On the opposite side, the stream that branched out into a mini lake was lined with gum trees. My eyes were fixed on the water while I chewed on something, though I don’t remember what.  Below, Eprapah Creek that flowed from Mt Cotton into Moreton Bay was about twelve kilometres long.

Continue reading Dinner by a Victoria point creek