Tag Archives: B.C.

Uncovering my city

Like many people during these difficult times, I’ve been exploring my city from walking the streets in my neighbourhood to hiking places I’ve never been before. If you live on B.C.’s west coast it’s not news that shorter day light hours, cooler temperatures, and constant rain wear down your enthusiasm to be outdoors. As a safe guard, I’ve encouraged a friend to join me once a week to keep me motivated, and we’ve agreed rain or shine, we’ll hike.

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Burnaby Mountain hike

Some time back, a friend and I climbed the five hundred steps up Burnaby Mountain to the park perched above. A view of Burrard Inlet, Belcarra’s Admiralty Point and North Vancouver’s Deep Cove peeked through the trees. 

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the crunch

The Crunch is a hiking trail that goes from the base of Westwood Plateau up to Coquitlam’s Eagle Ridge Drive. It’s only just over two kilometres one way, but the walkway rises 280 metres — the equivalent of walking up an 80-storey building.

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how much is too much?

During these strange times, instead of hiking through forests where the pathways are narrow, I’ve been exploring my neighbourhood. Even though it’s not as enjoyable, I can cross the road to keep my physical distance and I’ve discovered something about some people in my area.

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Pitt-Addington Marsh

Pitt-Addington Marsh was by Pitt Lake. The signage of this Pitt Meadows location was poor and grasses bent over the narrow neglected path, but the day was perfect and the scenery spectacular. Continue reading Pitt-Addington Marsh

Finally — a beaver

Over the years I’ve spent hours exercising around Lake LaFarge where I’ve admired an occasional bald eagle, a profusion of ducks and Canada geese and even a few tortoise sunning themselves on logs, but I had yet to spot a beaver. Continue reading Finally — a beaver

By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Along the Wreck Beach Trail I spied poles rising over the sand in the distance. This was where most people hung out, sitting on logs staring into the Straight of Georgia. Continue reading By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Art in the woods

Replicas of squatters’ cabins were sculptured along Maplewood Flats off the Burrard Inlet in the exact location where they  originally stood during the 1940s. Hovering over the tidal mud flats, the cabins on stilts housed a community of squatters who, by the 1960s, were hippies, artists and displaced loggers who craved nature and self-sufficiency. Continue reading Art in the woods