Tag Archives: Japanese temples

Naritasan Shinshorji Temple

When I first entered Narita’s temple more than twenty years ago, a New Year’s day ceremony was in full force. I climbed the steep steps to find there was no way I could squeeze into the main hall. Worshippers sat shoulder to shoulder while the sound of a drum beat a hypnotic rhythm. Continue reading Naritasan Shinshorji Temple

District of a thousand temples

I strolled the streets of Tokyo’s Yanaka District where it felt like there were temples on every corner. In fact, there were sixty — still a surprising number for this small district. Continue reading District of a thousand temples

Nanzenji Temple

This Kyoto temple was once the headquarters for a sect of Zen Buddhism, but in 1291 the detached palace was converted into a temple. As I passed by the main hall, I couldn’t help notice the number of gardeners busily keeping the grounds immaculate.
Continue reading Nanzenji Temple

Sho-ren-in

Sho-ren-in was known as one of the five Monzeki temples in Kyoto whose head priests were originally from the imperial family. It was one of the main lodgings in the mountain used by several well known priests. Continue reading Sho-ren-in

A Zen experience

At the entrance to Kyoto’s Kodai-ji Temple, was a familiar sight at Zen temples, mani wheels. A girl with itchy fingers fidgeted while I took a photo then spun the wheels. Continue reading A Zen experience

Drawn by a giant Bodhisattva

Once I passed the tourist shops from Kiyomizu-dera and the crowds thinned, I spotted a giant Bodhisattva statue I had to explore. Ryozen-kannon was a twenty-four metre high Bodhisattva statue that dominated the landscape. Continue reading Drawn by a giant Bodhisattva