Tag Archives: museums

Halifax’s connection to the Titanic

My main reason for visiting Halifax was it’s association to the Titanic disaster. The city was the closest port from where the Titanic sank back in April, 1912. It was no wonder there was a section in the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic dedicated to the calamity.

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Museum of Anthropology

Situated on Musqueam land, the Museum of Anthropology housed First Nation everyday objects and carvings from all over British Columbia. In one section the ceiling was a good thirty metres high to house the carved totem poles. Several brentwood boxes were on display that were not only for storage but were also used for cooking and sometimes as coffins. With so much rain on the west coast, these cedar boxes, using a steam-bending technique, were waterproof.

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Alberta’s Head-smashed-in buffalo jump

I’d read about this UNESCO world heritage site and how the Blackfoot Nation hunters guided herds of bison over three kilometres to a sandstone cliff where the herd tumbled over, breaking their legs and making them easy prey. I imagined a towering cliff, but it was actually just a three hundred metre drop.  

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Alberta’s Drumheller—from dinosaurs to hoodoos

I’ve made many trips to my neighbouring province, Alberta. It isn’t that it’s the most exciting province, although there are a few unique sites, but my daughter lives in Calgary.

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First steps on to Java

Years after I left Bali, I often regretted not seeing more of Indonesia—my nearest neighbour at the time. It wasn’t until well over a decade later, I landed in Jakarta with my nine-year-old daughter. Her two older sisters had gone to Canada, so I grabbed this opportunity like an Indian passenger half out of a rail carriage door but clinging on. I intended to explore Java from one end to the other.

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The changing face of chihkan tower

Tainan had been Taiwan’s capital for almost three hundred years when, in 1625 the Dutch arrived in the city. After the 1653 uprising against them, they built Fort Provintia, and made it the hub of their administrative and commercial activities. 

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Koxinga’s corner of tainan

Koxinga and his troops arrived in Taiwan not long after his failure at the Nanking battle in 1658. But in 1661 he captured Fort Provintia making it his residence. After he overthrew the Dutch in Fort Zeelandia, they left Taiwan in early 1662.

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Taiwan’s National Palace Museum

This museum housed a comprehensive look at Qing furniture, religious sculpture, masterpieces of jade, bronze items, ceramics, painting and calligraphy. The museum was well documented and covered several floors. It was easy to overlook which direction to wander as sometimes I felt like I was in a maze. Continue reading Taiwan’s National Palace Museum

Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

I only became aware of Taiwan’s aboriginal people in Thermal Valley when I entered the Ketagalan Cultural Centre. It documented the Ketagalan people’s decline after the Han Chinese came to the island in the 17thcentury, but there was little in the way of traditional artifacts, so I was eager to visit Shilin’s museum. Continue reading Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines