Tag Archives: National Parks

taijiang national park

Like Kenting National Park, Taijiang was hard to pin down. Perhaps because the park was divided into five zones — the ecological protected area, the scenic area, the cultural/historical area, recreational area and the existing used area. This last one was where oyster farms, aquaculture ponds, temples and villages filled land and waterways and wiped away the feel of a national park that covered both land and sea.

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taijiang national park’s sicao green tunnel

If you’ve never been surrounded by mangroves, Green Tunnel is the place to visit. I crossed the car park where litter lined the walkway. In fact, I’d walked all the way from Anshun Salt Flats, and loads of garbage had fluttered by the side of the road — and this was a national park.

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kenting national park?

Before I left the southern tip of Taiwan, I had to check something with Kenting National Park’s information center. I’d visited the centre when I first arrived, but I was confused because I felt I had missed the national park!

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shedding nature park

This was where I couldn’t understand how prices for different sites in Taiwan were decided. Maohitou definitely wasn’t worth the T$30 while at this nature park, there was so much to see and it was free. 

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Chuanfan’s Sail rock

I got off the bus to hike to Sheding Nature Park, but was sidetracked by a rock of many names. The giant boulder rolled down to the coast from a nearby plateau, and reminded me of Currumbin Rock on Queensland’s Gold Coast.

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Taiwan’s southern most tip

Eluanbi Park was famous for its lighthouse built with a moat and loopholes for cannons to ward off Taiwan’s original inhabitants — protesting aborigines against Chinese invasion. It was built in 1882, but there were far better sights to see along the trails that criss-crossed the promontory.

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Mobitou’s cat

Mobitou, situated on the far end of the Bashi Channel, was a rocky headland at the southern end of Taiwan’s western promontory. The shoreline that had eroded over time from wave action formed a wave-cut platform. 

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Qingshui cliffs

I expected the seven kilometre hike from Chongde Station to be an up hill battle, but the train had already gently risen before reaching the village and the hike was relatively flat. What made it difficult, was the final tunnel. It was a hair-raising hike through a one and a half kilometre dark tunnel with no sidewalk where trucks roared past and their noisy engines echoed off the tunnel ceiling.

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A hike by Cingshuei Cliffs

I was on my way to Qingshui Cliffs in Taroko National Park, but there was no public transport right to this site. Instead, I caught a train from Hualien to Chongde then had another seven kilometres to hike along coastal Suao-Hualien Highway.

Xiangde temple

I had half an hour before a bus arrived to take me back to Hualien, and Tianfeng pagoda beckoned on the other side of a bridge. Xiangde temple belonged to the Lin Ji Zong Buddhist sect and was only built in the 1960s because of the construction of the Central Cross-Island Highway. Later, the white Guanyin statue was added. Continue reading Xiangde temple