Tag Archives: Provincial parks

Hopewell Rocks Provincial Park

This provincial park is situated by the Bay of Fundy where one hundred billion tonnes to water flows in and out of this narrow bay twice a day. Because of the enormous amount of water, the water level rises by two metres per hour, meaning the level can rise as much as fourteen metres, depending on the position of the moon and sun. It is not surprising that this bay is famous for its giant tides. 

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Painted Chasm Provincial Park

Clinton was almost four hundred kilometres north-east of Vancouver and four kilometres from the town was Painted Chasm Provincial Park. It had been designated as protected land in 1940. Like other neighbouring regions, lava flows had formed coloured layers millions of years ago. Then ten thousand years back a waterfall formed the chasm and the layers were exposed.

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Pinnacle Provincial Park

Although Quesnel, situated at the junction of the Fraser and Quesnel Rivers had walkways along the rivers, I was keen to head six kilometres out of town to Pinnacles Provincial Park. Along the two-kilometre circuit were hoodoos which were not a patch on Drumheller’s, but still strange land formations.

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Nairn Falls Provincial Park

This small provincial park stretched parallel to the Sea-to Sky Highway. Located just north of Whistler and one hundred and fifty kilometres north of Vancouver, the trail by the Green River was an easy three-kilometre hike. 

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Joffre Lakes Provincial Park

Joffre Lakes Provincial Park was situated under two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver and east from Pemberton. It had only been designated a provincial park about twenty-five years ago, though much earlier the lakes had been named after a French general from World War 1.

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One of the three god’s mountains

I headed to Mara Provincial Marine Park to circuit the coastline. This was only a three kilometre trail running along the high cliffs above the East China Sea. I hoped for a better view of its highest point. Continue reading One of the three god’s mountains

An accidental return to Weaselhead Provincial Park

Over the pedestrian bridge that stretched across the Elbow River, I left the Elbow River Pathway by Glenmore Reservoir and entered Weaselhead Provincial Park. During a summer some years back, I’d visited this park. In the depths of winter however, it was unrecognizable. Continue reading An accidental return to Weaselhead Provincial Park

A suspension bridge?

I heard someone say as I left the Elk Falls Provincial Park on Vancouver Island, that they wanted to see the bridge. Really? What drew me to the site was the name, Elk Falls. The suspension bridge was just an extra surprise. Continue reading A suspension bridge?

A Wander through Elk Falls Provincial Park

This Vancouver Island provincial Park was not far west of Campbell River. With easy walking trails and a waterfall, I was surprised there weren’t even more people on the Sunday I visited. Continue reading A Wander through Elk Falls Provincial Park

First Nation Encounter

I was on my way to hike through Vancouver Island’s Elk Falls when I was greeted by singing and dancing. I’m not sure where this First Nation group were from, but their clothes were Haida Guai from the Queen Charlotte Islands. Continue reading First Nation Encounter