Tag Archives: Victoria

From ugliest to most stunning

After being in Melbourne for a couple of months, I admired many of its buildings, but coming across others I was surprised that such structures were allowed by any council. Continue reading From ugliest to most stunning

Beyond the beach

Leaving Williamstown Beach, I headed back to the pier passing through the Botanic Gardens opened in the 1860s. Most of the trees were unnamed, but walking between the avenue of palms and by giant Moreton Bay fig trees created a peaceful end to my hour long hike. Continue reading Beyond the beach

What is a lava blister?

To be honest, I’d never heard of a lava blister until I traipsed around Williamstown’s point and came across this unusual rock formation. Continue reading What is a lava blister?

A hike by the bay

Beginning at Williamstown’s Point Gellibrand Coastal Heritage Park, a trail ran parallel to Port Phillip Bay. I passed Shelley Beach where a multitude of sea birds gathered on the rocks extending into the sea. Others squawked overhead. Continue reading A hike by the bay

A rare tower

Situated in Point Gellibrand Coastal Park on the outskirts of Williamstown was the timeball tower where Europeans first settled in Victoria. In 1849 when the tower was originally constructed, it was a lighthouse made from bluestone, quarried and built by convict prisoners. Some ten years later, the lighthouse became a timeball tower which allowed ships to adjust their chronometers. Continue reading A rare tower

Over a bridge and out to sea

Along the southern end of St Kilda beach, a trickle of water headed into Port Phillip Bay from Elwood Canal. This was once Elwood Creek during the days when much of the area was swamp and birds swarmed over the muddy creek bed in search of worms. Continue reading Over a bridge and out to sea

Melbourne’s Tan

The Tan Track was established in 1901. At that time, it comprised of four lanes: a path for horses, one for carriages, a bicycle lane, and a pedestrian path. The name Tan, was derived from the type of bark that covered the equestrian track. Over one hundred years later, only one track remains that is longer than the original.  Continue reading Melbourne’s Tan

A lush Melbourne park

Fitzroy Gardens, named after an early New South Wales governor, was on the edge of the city centre located on a generous section of land. If I’d hoped to see an abundance of Australian native trees, I would have been disappointed. There were a few pines, gum trees and Moreton Bay fig tees, but this was more of an English park. Chestnut and elm trees appeared to have been planted when the park first opened 150 years ago because their girth and height was vast. Continue reading A lush Melbourne park

A tour behind locked doors

We headed to the State Theatre on Melbourne’s St Kilda Road to take a peek at the three theatres that make up the Arts Centre. The tour included the theatre designs and the paintings chosen for each location. Continue reading A tour behind locked doors