Tag Archives: WW11

why were geelong’s old buildings preserved?

Unlike most cities where highrise dominates the landscape, Geelong’s old buildings were spared demolition. There was a reason for this and it wasn’t just a handful of people who argued against the loss of these tasteful buildings.

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geelong’s Federal woollen mills

I headed to the western edge of Port Phillip Bay to North Geelong combing antique stores when I spotted the tasteful Federal Woollen Mills’ main building. The brick factory was constructed by the first Australian Labour Government in 1915 and offered better working conditions for factory employees. Workers were responsible for scouring, carding, dyeing, spinning and weaving Australian wool into cloth using the mill’s own power plant.

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Bukit Batok nature park

Set close to the centre of Singapore Island, I hiked towards an abandoned quarry site in Bukit Batok Nature Park. Not only the sound of birds hovered in the air, but a distant wooden flute breezed a relaxing melody through the park that was established in 1988. When I reached the old quarry, now filled with water, a man faced the lake, his flute notes echoing off the cliff face opposite. His melodies rang through most of the park which was in the process of eliminating all plants that weren’t native to Singapore so that it would truly be a nature park.

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Sites of Korea’s dark tourism

During the Joseon period, smoke signal stations and beacon mounds were used to transmit urgent political or military news by smoke or torchlight. These stations were built on hills where there had once been additional stations roughly six kilometres to the east and west of Sagye-ri’s station. Continue reading Sites of Korea’s dark tourism

Jeju Peace Park

There was a solemn atmosphere as soon as I stepped into the main hall in Peace Park and crept down a dark tunnel. I knew about Korea’s suffering under Japanese occupation and expected some of that history to be on display, but this was more about after 1945 when Koreans thought they’d be liberated. Continue reading Jeju Peace Park

Yokohama’s skyline

Yokohama was a network of modern skyscrapers along the Bay of Tokyo. I took a waterfront hike to Rinko Park passing nearly as many cranes operating on building sites as completed structures. Continue reading Yokohama’s skyline

District of a thousand temples

I strolled the streets of Tokyo’s Yanaka District where it felt like there were temples on every corner. In fact, there were sixty — still a surprising number for this small district. Continue reading District of a thousand temples

Roaming Tokyo’s famous park

I would have avoided Ueno Park after experiencing Koishikawa Korakuen Gardens but for a scene in a Japanese movie where two characters met. That scene made me want to venture into Tokyo’s famous park. Conveniently, it was right next to Ueno Station. Continue reading Roaming Tokyo’s famous park

Tiny island in the bay

King Island was a small island off Wellington Point that was a popular Moreton Bay tourist destination in the early 1900s. For a couple of years during that era, the Phillips family lived on the island because one of their children was advised to bathe daily in the salt water to ease her polio symptoms. Continue reading Tiny island in the bay

Drawn by a giant Bodhisattva

Once I passed the tourist shops from Kiyomizu-dera and the crowds thinned, I spotted a giant Bodhisattva statue I had to explore. Ryozen-kannon was a twenty-four metre high Bodhisattva statue that dominated the landscape. Continue reading Drawn by a giant Bodhisattva