Category Archives: Canada’s British Columbia

Queen Elizabeth Park’s hiking trails

This was one of Vancouver’s best city locations for a hike. Not only were there plenty of trails away from traffic, but many were up hill. Continue reading Queen Elizabeth Park’s hiking trails

Queen Elizabeth Park’s quarry gardens

Named after the Queen Mother, this Vancouver park was established back in the 1930s after the mountain had been quarried for rocks for road building. To cover the eye sore left from quarrying, sunken gardens were established. Continue reading Queen Elizabeth Park’s quarry gardens

A park with a view

I reached the highest point of Queen Elizabeth Park, which happened to be the highest point in Vancouver at over 150 metres above sea level. Like everyone else, I was drawn to the stone wall with the view of the city spread out below. Continue reading A park with a view

Amongst the flowers

Because it hadn’t visited Vancouver’s most well known park in close to two decades, I decided to catch the skytrain and return, even though I knew Queen Elizabeth Park was on the tourist radar with as many as six million annual visitors. Continue reading Amongst the flowers

Whytecliff Park

At 124 ha, this park was the largest in West Vancouver. I hiked down to the stony beach where Whyte Islet drew me like a sleepwalker. I stumbled over the rocky stretch towards the boulder. Empty diarrhetic shellfish lay scattered between rocks in their thousands. Continue reading Whytecliff Park

A hidden park

Myrtle Park wooded area, opposite North Vancouver’s Strathcoma Park, lay hidden behind suburbia. If it wasn’t for two hikers walking towards the entrance I might have missed it completely. Continue reading A hidden park

A sight for sore eyes?

An ugly cement structure sat overlooking Indian Arm at the end of North Vancouver’s Malcolm Lowry Trail. It looked like something built during WWII, but it was dated 1916. When Robert Dollar came from California, he constructed this mill site which included homes for key employers and bunk beds for the mill workers. While this was a large operation, all that remained when I visited, was the burner foundation. Continue reading A sight for sore eyes?