Category Archives: Canada’s British Columbia

As still as its name

I’d hiked the Burnaby Lake trail in the summer, but because I had to meet up with someone, didn’t have enough time to circuit more than half of the trail. It took me until fall before I returned, starting at the opposite end away from where the Brunette River flowed into Burnaby Lake to hike the trail near Still Creek. Continue reading As still as its name

Burnaby Lake

Situated in the city of Burnaby, this lake stretched for approximately four kilometres with lilies covering its surface in several locations. Home to countless Canada geese, it wasn’t uncommon to observe a flock glide and land on its still waters. Continue reading Burnaby Lake

UBC’s Botanical Gardens’ North Gardens

A group of university students rushed ahead of me leaving the Asian gardens. They turned into the tunnel that went under South West Marine Drive to the North Garden.

Continue reading UBC’s Botanical Gardens’ North Gardens

UBC Botanical Gardens Asian section

I’d never visited these gardens before although I’d driven past a number of times. The Asian Garden was nothing like any Botanical Gardens I’d visited. It was not laid out in neat rows with every tree labeled. It was more like a beautiful forest. Continue reading UBC Botanical Gardens Asian section

By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Along the Wreck Beach Trail I spied poles rising over the sand in the distance. This was where most people hung out, sitting on logs staring into the Straight of Georgia. Continue reading By the sea of Pacific Spirit

Vancouver’s infamous Wreck Beach

I stepped off UBC grounds and down steps for some 200 metres until I reached a stony beach. This was not your regular beach. The sign warned — a clothing optional beach. I had known this before I ventured down its steps, but thought on a brisk cool day I wouldn’t find anyone parading around without their clothes. Continue reading Vancouver’s infamous Wreck Beach

Beyond the museum

Outside Vancouver’s Anthropology Museum was the Haida house exhibit. This group of First Nation buildings were from those who inhabited the Queen Charlotte Islands. The buildings were constructed back in the early 1960s under the guidance of First Nation artist, Bill Reid. He even carved some of the house poles and free standing Haida poles. Continue reading Beyond the museum